Datapoint 2200

(2 customer reviews)

Announced

June 1970

Price

US $7,800 (8K Version I in 1972)

CPU

discrete logic – no CPU chip

Memory

2K-8K serial shift register (Version I)
4K-16K RAM (Version II)

Display

7×3.5-inch CRT, 80×12 text

Datapoint 2200 is one of the first mass-produced personal computers.

The Datapoint 2200 is a programmable terminal designed by  Phil Ray and Gus Roche, announced by Computer Terminal Corporation (CTC) in June 1970, and marketed en masse from 1971. Many terminals at the time had a single function, but the Datapoint 2200 was designed as an inexpensive terminal that can be connected to various mainframes by loading various terminal emulators with magnetic (cassette) tape.

 

The Datapoint 2200 had a built-in full keyboard, a built-in monochrome monitor (green) with 12 lines by 80 columns and two 47 characters per inch cassette drives with a capacity of 130 kB each .

A Female using Datapoint 2200 – The era of personal computer

 

Datapoint 2200 was designed as a versatile and economical computer for connecting to various computers, loading emulation programs from tape, whereas most terminals of the time were hardwired. The Datapoint 2200 had 8 KB of internal memory and used cassettes with a capacity of 130 KB to store information 1 . An 8-inch floppy disk drive then became available .

Datapoint 2200 has a different connection to computer history. The original design was to use a single-chip 8-bit microprocessor as the CPU instead of a TTL circuit module. In 1969, CTC commissioned Intel and Texas Instruments (TI) to develop the chip. TI couldn’t make a chip that works stably, so it got off on the way, but Intel completed it for the time being. However, its performance did not meet the requirements of CTC, so CTC was forced to manufacture it with a TTL circuit .

Open casing Datapoint 2200
Open casing Datapoint 2200

 

The large circuit board on the lower left comprises the “central processor”

 

while Intel’s single-chip design was finally published in April 1972 under the name Intel 8008 . Nevertheless, the 8008 CPU is of pioneering importance

Announced: June 1970
Released: November 1970
Price: US $7,800
Processor  no CPU chip
Memory: 2K-8K serial shift register
Display: 7×3.5-inch CRT, 80×12 text
Ports: System bus
Storage:  130K each
OS: Cassette Tape Operating System

x86 architecture 

 

References:

  1. Wikipedia
  2. https://historyofinformation.com/detail.php?entryid=3730
Announced

June 1970

Price

US $7,800 (8K Version I in 1972)

CPU

discrete logic – no CPU chip

Memory

2K-8K serial shift register (Version I)
4K-16K RAM (Version II)

Display

7×3.5-inch CRT, 80×12 text

2 reviews for Datapoint 2200

  1. Holger

    Great website for old computers – my grandad used this pc ; thank you so much for keeping history alive!

  2. Kevin

    Thank you for putting together this great website. There are none like it!
    I love looking back at what “state of the art” was way back when. I remember the “Trash 80”, the Tandy 1000 (which I owned), and the Commodore 64 which were all amazing for the time.

    Now we commonly have terabyte hard disks you can almost conceal in a shirt pocket, and insanely fast processors with four or more cores running at several gigahertz. Incerdible!

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